Restarting the game

29 Aug, 2014

Lyna M writes (excerpted):

I bought your book Python for Kids with the intention to teach my son Python later on but have now been using it myself to learn Python as I find your book to be quite comprehensive even if it was 'for kids'.

I've been doing the Bounce tutorial and would like to find a way to add a restart button so that each time the game ends, the player can restart the game if they want to.

I've applied the codes for Game Over but would like to add a restart button after that.

if ball.hit_bottom == True:
    time.sleep
    canvas.itemconfig(game_over_text, state='normal')
    btn = Button(tk, text="Click to Restart Game")
    btn.pack()
tk.update_idletasks()
tk.update()
time.sleep(0.01)

tk = Tk()
btn = Button(tk, text="Click to Restart Game")
btn.pack()

How to tie in the button so that it restarts the game when clicked? I've been trying out codes from forums and blogs but they don't seem to work or are too hard to understand.

There's a few ways you can handle the restart. If you look at the programming puzzles in Chapter 14, the first challenge is to delay the game start using the <Button-1> binding; to tie a mouse button click to a function which then starts the game. You could adapt that function to also restart the game once it's over. That's probably the most seamless approach.

If you really want to use a button, you need a way to add it just once -- because where you've added it (inside the loop), you'll get one button added to the window for every iteration of the loop. After the loop finishes isn't really the right place either.

First of all you'll need a Game class which will tie all the game objects together. Basically the new class would have object variables to 'store' the paddle, the ball, the score, the game-over-text, and also your restart button (initially the restart button variable would be set to None). So rather than adding the button inside the if-statement, you might do something like this:

    game = Game(canvas, paddle, ball, score, game_over_text)

    ---  ---

    while 1:

        ---  ---

        if ball.hit_bottom == True:
            time.sleep(1)
            canvas.itemconfig(game_over_text, state='normal')
            if game.restart_button is None:
                game.add_restart()

In the above code, we check if the value of the game variable restart_button is None (in other words, the button is not currently displayed), we call a function add_restart - so that fixes the problem of adding the button more than once. Here's the code for adding the button:

class Game:

    ---  ---

    def add_restart(self):
        self.restart_button = Button(tk, text="Click to Restart Game", command=self.restart)
        self.restart_button.pack()

The command associated with the button is the function on our Game class called restart - this is the bit of code that takes care of hiding the "Game Over" text, putting the ball and paddle back in their starting positions, and so on.

Hope that helps somewhat.


Co-existence

28 Aug, 2014

Marta C writes:

I'm new in programming. I just want to know if it would be too hard or complicated to use Python 2.7 with the Python for Kids book? I am still practicing for a class I took with v 2.7. Can I have both IDLE 2.7 and 3 in the system and use them separately and not run into problems? Thank you.

Most of the examples in the book will work with Python 2.7 -- but some won't without modification (particularly anything using the tkinter module). And you may hit subtle problems which will be harder to figure out as a consequence. However, you can install both Python 2.7 and 3 on the same system (you didn't say, but I'm guessing you're using Windows -- after installation, you'll find you've got both c:\Python27 and c:\Python34 directories, assuming you install the latest Python version, on your hard drive) -- just make sure you select the correct directory when setting up the IDLE shortcut (described in Chapter 1).


Is The Animation Loop Necessary?

17 Aug, 2014

Christopher D writes:

I'm currently working through your book and enjoying it immensely. The following is baffling me though, so hoping you can help.

In Chapter 13, page 197 (after creating the ball object), you wrote: "If you run this program now using Run>Module, the canvas will appear for a split second and then vanish". You then go on to write about how its necessary to add the animation loop to stop this happening.

My window appears and draws the ball correctly, but does not vanish. Reading through the code I don't understand why it's expected to disappear either. This seems to be a key point so would be grateful if you could shed light! I'm running Python 3.4.1 by the way.

Thank you in advance for your help!

You've found an error in the book, I'm afraid. If you run the code using the Python console (try it by opening a command prompt, or terminal, and running python bounce.py), the window will indeed appear and vanish. The basic idea is, there's nothing left for it to do, so no reason for the window to remain open. That's the reason for adding an animation loop of some kind (in the book I use a very basic while-loop, but tkinter also has a mainloop function for doing this). However, when you run the same code with Idle (the Python Shell), which is written using tkinter, the window remains open because there's already a main loop running (started by the Shell itself). So the book is both right and wrong, I guess, depending on how you want to run the code. The errata has been updated accordingly. Thanks for the "bug report".


Trouble with Automator

27 Jul, 2014

Jean-Jacques B writes:

I am trying to set up my iMac for the book, having trouble with the automator script:

open -a "Applications/Python 3.2/IDLE.app" --args -n

Run Shell Script failed open: unrecognized option '--args'

I can get python to launch the other ways, but then turtle doesn't work.

This had me stumped for a moment (couldn't find any similar errors when I googled).

It actually looks like a poorly handled error in the Automator. If you copy+paste what you entered into the Terminal, you get an entirely different error message:

$ open -a "Applications/Python 3.2/IDLE.app" --args -n
Unable to find application named 'Applications/Python 3.2/IDLE.app'

Which hopefully helps you figure out where you went wrong... try adding a / (slash) in front of the path to IDLE. eg.:

open -a "/Applications/Python 3.2/IDLE.app" --args -n

Python 3.4 Shell

15 Jun, 2014

Kirk K writes:

On page 12 it says File>New Window but I cannot find it on our Windows version 3.4.1. Please advise.

It looks like, as of Python 3.4, they've changed the menu, so File->New Window has become File->New File (which makes the Shell consistent with other text editors, at least). It still has the same behaviour though - opening a new window for typing in your Python code.